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This page explains how each calculator on Sorted works. It includes details of the assumptions that have been made for each calculator and the methodology used to provide the results. Find out about the calculators:

Overview

The Sorted calculators, planners and quizzes ask you to enter some information about you and your money. They then do the calculations for you and present the results.

The calculators give you ballpark figures only - in other words, they'll give you a good idea of actual results but won't be absolutely exact. Please read Sorted's terms and conditions which explain that the calculators should be used as a guide and a starting point only, and do not replace seeking professional advice.

Adjustments for inflation

The results given by some calculators show the effect of inflation at 2%. The amount of 2% is the midpoint in the Government’s long term range for inflation of between 1% and 3%.

In calculators which adjust for the effect of inflation, the results shown are in today's dollars. This means that the actual dollar amounts that you pay or receive in the future are likely to be more than the figures shown, but the figures shown will have the same buying power as today. For example, if you could buy something worth $1000 now, in 10 years’ time, you would need $1220 to buy that same thing (assuming 2% inflation).

The calculators which include the effect of inflation in the results are:

  • Savings calculator
  • Retirement planner
  • KiwiSaver savings calculator

In these calculators, you can see your results without the effect of inflation by selecting the button ‘Inflation adjusted results?’ so it turns off. You can include the effect of inflation again by reselecting the button so it turns on.

Saving your calculators

You can save the information you entered and your results once you have registered for a free, secure Sorted account. This means you can return later to make updates and to review progress. Sorted will allow you to store multiple versions of most calculators. When you're using any calculator, you can choose between:

‘Save’: This allows you to save your work to your account (like a normal “Save” option in other applications). Repeatedly saving in this way will overwrite any previous work you had done.

Save a copy to My Sorted: This allows you to save your work as a separate version and give it a new name (like “Save as” in other applications). Any other copies saved under their past names will remain stored in your Sorted account.

Note: If you are working on a saved calculator and select ‘new’, it will reset the calculator. If you then select ‘Save’, you overwrite any work you've saved. So it pays to select ‘Save a copy’ if you are going to start again, just in case you want to look back on your work.

Disclaimer

The results of the investor kickstarter are a guide only. They do not constitute investment advice to any person. The Commission for Financial Capability recommends that investors seek independent advice.

Neither the Commission for Financial Capability nor its employees accept any liability for any loss or damage of any kind arising out of the use of, or reliance on, the information provided in this calculator including, without limitation, any loss of profit or other damage, direct or consequential. Please read our website terms and conditions.


 

Budgeting Tool

What it does

The budgeting tool works out the difference between the money you have coming in and the money going out. It tells you whether you have money left over for other expenses or for saving. If your plan shows you don’t have enough, you’ll need to adjust your spending or find ways to increase your income.

Calculation methodology

First you enter details of your current income and spending, assigning amounts to categories. Then the budgeting tool adds up all of your spending and deducts the total from your salary or earnings to work out the difference between your income and expenditure.

Results

The budgeting tool shows whether you have surplus income or a shortfall, and how much. It also shows an overview graph of your outgoings broken down into your categories, and colour-coded as per your categories.

The budgeting tool results are shown without the effect of inflation.

You can save your budget to your Sorted account so you can come back at a later date and review or update it.

Have a go

Try the budgeting tool.

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Goal planner

What it does

Use the goal planner to set goals for your money. Choose from the suggested financial goals, and/or create your own. Assign each goal a dollar amount, and decide whether it’s for the short (1–3 years), medium (4–9 years) or long term (10 years or more). You can have up to six goals in each timeframe. Goals can be moved between different timeframes.

Results

You can save your goals to your Sorted account so you can come back at a later date and review or update them. The goal planner also points to further tools and links on Sorted – resources that can help you make your goals reality.

Have a go

Try the goal planner.

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Net Worth Calculator

What it does

The Net Worth Calculator works out how well off you are (your net worth) by taking into account everything you own (your assets) and everything that you owe (your liabilities). Ideally, your net worth will increase over the years as you own more and owe less.

Calculation methodology

The wealth tracker asks you for the current value of the things you own including your house, vehicle, shares, superannuation and other savings. You also enter everything you owe including your mortgage, HP, loans and credit card debt.

The calculator adds up everything you own and deducts everything that you owe. The result is your net worth.

If you wish to plan for or estimate your net worth in the future, you can enter figures for 10 years and 20 years’ time.

Results

The Net Worth Calculator shows your current net worth, and may also display your estimated net worth in 10 and 20 years’ time.

You can save your Net Worth Calculator to your Sorted account so you can come back at a later date and review or update it.

Have a go

Try the net worth calculator.

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Money personality quiz

What it does

This quiz provides a light-hearted and fun way for you to think about your own strengths and weaknesses when it comes to how you manage your money. It was created by a clinical psychologist.

Calculation methodology

The money personality quiz asks you to choose one of two answers to 25 questions. It uses your choices to work out which of 16 money personality types best describe you.

Results

The results provide a summary of your money personality type and a description of your strengths and possible blind-spots in the way you manage your money.

The 16 personality types are:

  • Adviser speculator
  • System innovator
  • Insightful investor
  • Authentic dreamer
  • Money mechanic
  • Practical domestic
  • Sensible drifter
  • Financial controller
  • Entrepreneur
  • Money mentor
  • Visual stylist
  • Money surgeon
  • Money maestro
  • Money organiser
  • Hedonist 

You can save your money personality profile to My Sorted so you can come back at a later date and review or update it.

What if?

If you find it difficult for some questions to choose between the two answers, you can redo the quiz choosing the alternative responses. If the result is a different money personality profile, you may find the description helpful as well.

Have a go

Try the money personality quiz.

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Debt calculator

What it does

The debt calculator shows you how long it will take you to pay off your credit card, hire purchase, or car loan debt, and the total amount of interest you will pay. It also splits the total repayments into the amount that reduces the balance and the amount that pays off the interest.

The calculator features an interactive slider, which will increase the repayment amount as you slide the bar across. As it does this, you will see the time to repay, total interest and total you will pay all reduce. At the bottom of your results graph, you will see an icon that says ‘you will pay X times the amount your borrowed’. This works by dividing the total amount paid by the initial loan amount. The figure is rounded to two decimal places, and will not appear of the result is below 1.20.

Assumptions

The debt calculator assumes your repayments stay the same each year.

Calculation methodology

First, you choose the type of debt you want to find out about: credit card, hire purchase, car loan, or personal loan. Then the debt calculator asks you to enter the amount owed and the interest rate.

  • For credit cards you also enter the repayment amount. The results show the total you will pay and the time it will take to fully repay the credit card debt. The debt calculator starts with the amount owed, reduces it by the repayment amount, and adds interest each period using the interest rate, until the amount owed reaches zero. The final repayment amount is the minimum of the remaining amount owed and the standard repayment amount.
  • For hire purchase and car loans you also enter details of any interest-free period, start-up and other fees, the total term and repayment frequency. The results show the minimum repayment amount.
  • For personal loans you also enter the total term of the loan and repayment frequency. The results show the minimum repayment amount.
  • If you have more than one credit card, more than one hire purchase, or several other loans, enter them each separately by selecting the Add another button at the bottom of the section.

If you enter your date of birth, the debt calculator determines how old you will be when the debt has been repaid.

Results

Except for credit card debt, all the results show the minimum repayment amount.

For all types of debt, the results show:

  • The total amount you will pay - which is the sum of the repayments
  • The total interest you will pay - which is the total amount paid less the initial amount owed
  • The time to repay - which is the number of years and months it will take to repay the debt
  • How old you will be when the debt is repaid.

For hire purchase and car loans, the calculator allows for periods of no repayments and no interest. It also allows for various types of fees.

You can save your debt calculator to your Sorted account so you can come back at a later date and review or update it

What if?

If you choose an increased repayment amount or a shorter loan term, the calculator repeats the exercise and shows the savings you gain (calculated as the difference between the initial total amount paid and the new total amount paid) and how much faster you would pay off the debt.

Results are shown without inflation.

Have a go

Try the debt calculator.

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Mortgage calculator

What it does

The mortgage calculator works out how much you'll pay each week, fortnight or month in order to pay off your mortgage by the end of the mortgage term. It can also show how long it will take you to pay off your mortgage based on the repayments you make. It also allows for a lump-sum payment to be made, and can show you how to pay off your mortgage faster by increasing your repayments.

The calculator shows the total amount you'd pay with interest, and splits it into the amount that reduces the balance and the amount that pays off the interest.

If you enter your date of birth, the calculator can also determine how old you will be when the mortgage is repaid.

The calculator features an interactive slider, which will increase the repayment amount as you slide the bar across. As it does this, you will see the time to repay, total interest and total you will pay all reduce. At the bottom of your results graph, you will see an icon that says ‘you will pay X times the amount your borrowed’. This works by dividing the total amount paid by the initial loan amount. The figure is rounded to two decimal places, and will not appear of the result is below 1.20.

Assumptions

The calculator assumes that your repayments stay the same for the term of the mortgage, and any lump sum payment is made today

Calculation methodology

First, the mortgage calculator asks you to enter the mortgage amount, interest rate, repayment amount (if known), the repayment frequency (weekly, fortnightly or monthly) and the term of the loan.

You can also enter a lump-sum payment (a one-off amount you pay in addition to your regular repayments). The calculations assume you make the lump sum payment today, so the total amount owing is reduced by the lump sum for the entire duration of the mortgage.

If your mortgage is split between fixed and floating, work out the fixed and floating amounts separately using the 'Mortgage one' and 'Mortgage two' tabs.

The calculator uses the mortgage amount and the term of the loan to calculate the regular repayment amount needed for the mortgage amount, and interest to be repaid at the end of the mortgage term. You can then alter the repayment amount to see how this effects the total you will pay and the mortgage term.

The calculator adds the interest to the total loan amount, based on the interest rate and mortgage term entered, to show the total cost of the mortgage. This is visually separated into principal and interest.

Results

The results show:

  • The amount of your weekly, fortnightly or monthly repayments
  • The total amount paid - which is the sum of the repayments
  • The total interest paid - which is the total amount paid less the initial amount owed
  • The time to repay - which is the number of years it will take to repay the mortgage
  • How old you will be when the mortgage is repaid

Results are shown without inflation.

You can save your mortgage calculator to your Sorted account so you can come back at a later date and review or update it.

What if?

  • If you choose an alternative term, the calculator determines the repayment amount that will reduce the mortgage amount to zero by the end of the new term and shows your age at the end of the new term. It also shows you the total amount paid, which if you choose a shorter term will be less.
  • If you choose an increased repayment amount, the calculator shows the savings you gain (calculated as the difference between the initial total amount paid and the new total amount paid) and how much faster you would pay off the mortgage.

Have a go

Try the mortgage calculator.

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Savings calculator

What it does

The savings calculator shows you either how much you need to save on a regular basis to reach your savings goal, or how much you will have if you save a regular amount over a period of time.

The calculator features an interactive slider, which will increase the savings amount as you slide the bar across. As it does this, you will see the interest and total amount increase. The savings term is fixed and will not be adjusted by the slider. If you are saving for a goal, the slider will increase the regular savings amount and interest, therefore reducing time to save.

Assumptions

The savings calculator assumes the following:

  • Your savings stay the same each year.
  • Your savings are added to each month by the amount of interest earned, calculated at a compound interest rate. (1.06^(1/12)-1)
  • Interest payments are made at the end of each month.
  • Inflation of 2% is assumed.

Calculation methodology

This calculator starts by asking you whether you want to either:

  • Save for a goal over a period of time, or
  • Save a regular amount for a period of time

Saving for a goal

If you are saving for a goal, the calculator asks you to enter your goal amount and the date you need it.

The saving calculator works out how much you need to save on a regular basis to reach your savings goal in the timeframe you specified. It allows for any amount you’ve already saved and the interest it earns, as well as the interest you will earn on your regular savings.

Results

The results show you how much you need to save each period (e.g. each week, fortnight, month or year) as well as the total interest your savings earn between now and your goal date.

If you enter your date of birth, the savings calculator can work out your age at the end of the saving period.

Results are shown with the effect of 2% inflation. To see your results without the effect of inflation, select the button ‘Inflation adjusted results?’ so it turns off. You can include the effect of inflation again by reselecting the button so it turns on. The default interest rate shown is also 2%, which will mean that the interest calculated in your results panel will show as ‘$0’. If you reduce the interest to below 2%, you will see that interest will become a negative value, as inflation of 2% means that your savings will lose value. To see interest without inflation (where there will always be a positive number), simply turn the ‘inflation adjusted results’ button off.

Saving a regular amount

If you are saving (or planning to save) a regular amount over a period of time, the calculator asks you to enter the amount and how often you save it (e.g. weekly, fortnightly, monthly or yearly). It also asks you to select an end date for your regular saving.

The savings calculator adds up the amount you save and adds interest to the balance each period until the end date.

Results

The results show you how much you will have contributed to your savings at the end date, the total interest your savings are expected to earn, and the total of your savings (your contributions plus the expected interest).

If you choose an increased savings amount, the calculator shows you either:

  • How much faster you would reach your savings goal, or
  • How much more you would save during the selected period.

If you enter your date of birth, the savings calculator can work out your age at the end of the saving period.

You can save your savings calculator to your Sorted account so you can come back at a later date and review or update it.

Results are shown with the effect of 2% inflation. To see your results without the effect of inflation, select the button ‘Inflation adjusted results?’ so it turns off. You can include the effect of inflation again by reselecting the button so it turns on. The default interest rate shown is also 2%, which will mean that the interest calculated in your results panel will show as ‘$0’. If you reduce the interest to below 2%, you will see that interest will become a negative value, as inflation of 2% means that your savings will lose value. To see interest without inflation (where there will always be a positive number), simply turn the ‘inflation adjusted results’ button off.

Have a go

Try the savings calculator.

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Retirement Planner 

What it does

The retirement planner helps you work out how much you will need to save for your retirement depending on the lifestyle you’d like. You can include any superannuation schemes and KiwiSaver as well as your partner's savings in your plan.

(Please note: all amounts are net of fees, taxes and adjusted for inflation unless otherwise indicated. So for example, the goal you set as a retirement income for you lifestyle is the amount you'd receive in the hand.)

The calculator features an interactive slider, which will increase the savings amount as you slide the bar across. This will increase the percentage of income contributed to a KiwiSaver fund, therefore increasing the total savings and income per week. Earnings before tax is fixed and cannot be adjusted by the slider.

The calculator also includes a tooltip around using KiwiSaver to buy your first home. This tool uses the data entered to provide an estimate of the amount you will have from KiwiSaver in 3 years and 5 years from today.

Assumptions

The retirement planner assumes the following:

  • New Zealand Superannuation (NZ Super) begins when you turn 65 and continues for the period of time you could be expected to live.
  • If you choose to include your partner in the calculations, the retirement planner assumes your partner starts receiving NZ Super when they turn 65.
  • The life expectancy rates are from the latest mortality tables produced by Statistics New Zealand.
  • The NZ Super rate shown in the retirement planner is either the married rate (if a couple) or the single rate. If your situation is different, you can enter a different rate (see the current NZ Super rates). You may wish to use a different rate entirely. For example, you may want to plan for your retirement assuming that there will be no NZ Super at all. In this case, change the value of NZ Super to zero.
  • All investments are in a managed balanced fund which is a portfolio investment entity (PIE). The net real return from the balanced fund is therefore assumed to be 2.4% per annum (based on an assumed tax rate of 28%).
  • Your total savings are used up during retirement so that nothing is left over at the end of your expected lifetime. For a couple, this is the expected lifetime of whichever partner has the longest life-expectancy.
  • The payments you receive increase with inflation each year.
  • Inflation of 2% is assumed. 

Calculator methodology

First, the retirement planner asks you to select your age (and your partner's age if you want to include them in the calculations) and the amount of income you want to have to live on when you retire (this is the amount you want in hand after any tax has been deducted). You then enter any lump sums (including KiwiSaver) from which you expect to receive income and any other sources of income such as rent.

The retirement planner splits retirement into two periods:

  • The period before you reach the age of 65
  • The period after you reach age of 65

This is because there are some sources of income that are not available before the age of 65 (for example, NZ Super and KiwiSaver). 

The retirement planner:

  1. Takes your desired retirement income and subtracts any other sources of income that are available before the age of 65. This is shown as the pre-65 retirement income shortfall.
  2. Takes your desired retirement income and subtracts any other sources of income available after the age of 65. This is shown as the post-65 retirement income shortfall.
  3. Values the shortfall for each period as a lump sum at the point your retirement starts. The pre-65 period is valued as a lump sum at the point your retirement starts, and the post-65 period is valued as a lump sum at the point the retirement starts.
  4. Adds together the two lump sums and shows the resulting amount as the lump sum required at retirement to fund your desired retirement income.
  5. Determines the amount you need to save regularly between now and retirement to achieve the lump sum required at retirement (your savings target).

This table shows the amounts used in the retirement planner calculations: 

Amount

Description

Pre-65 retirement income shortfall

 

Your desired retirement income minus any other sources of income available to you before the age of 65.

Post-65 retirement income shortfall

 

Your desired retirement income minus any other sources of income available to you after the age of 65.

Lump sum required at retirement

 

The shortfall for the pre-65 and post-65 periods valued as a lump sum at the point your retirement starts and then added together. This is the amount you need to save.

Regular savings

The amount you need to save regularly (e.g. weekly or monthly) between now and retirement to achieve the lump sum required at retirement.

 

Results

The retirement planner shows the amount of the shortfall from (or the surplus over) your desired retirement income. Where there is a shortfall, the retirement planner also shows how much you need to save regularly to build the lump sum required to give you the extra income you want.

Results are shown with the effect of 2% inflation. To see your results without the effect of inflation, select the button Inflation adjusted results? so it turns off. You can include the effect of inflation again by reselecting the button so it turns on.

You can save your retirement planner to your Sorted account so you can come back at a later date and review or update it.

Have a go

Try the retirement planner.

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KiwiSaver savings calculator

What it does

The KiwiSaver savings calculator shows you how much you may have saved at retirement age based on your continued membership in KiwiSaver and the contribution level you have chosen. It also provides an estimate of the regular income that you could get from the total lump sum in your account.

Adjustment for inflation

The total amount shown is the estimated buying power of the total amount including inflation at 2%. For example, by the time you reach age 65 your KiwiSaver statement might show a total balance of $279,500. However, as the price of everything will have increased by that time, you would only be able to buy $126,600 worth of goods at today's prices.

Assumptions

The KiwiSaver savings calculator assumes the following:

  • If you select Employed, the KiwiSaver savings calculator assumes your pay increases at 3.5% per year and that your contributions increase in line with your pay. For example, $200 today will be $230 in 4 years’ time. The assumed pay increase of 3.5% is included in the calculations by applying a margin to the assumed long term rate of inflation (2%).
  • If you select Self-employed or Not working, the KiwiSaver savings calculator assumes that the contribution amount increases each year with inflation.
  • You take no contributions holidays.
  • No amounts are withdrawn for home purchase or mortgage diversion.
  • If you join KiwiSaver after age 60, you maintain your contribution levels for 5 years.
  • Tax credits worth the maximum of $521 are included at the end of each member credit year which runs from 1 July to 30 June. (Note: To receive the total tax credit you must be a KiwiSaver member for the entire member credit year.)
  • Your investments are in a managed balanced fund which is a portfolio investment entity (PIE). Your PIE income is taxed at either 28%, 17.5% or 10.5%, depending on your total taxable income.
  • Your net real return from the balanced fund will be either 2.4%, 2.9% or 3.3% per year depending on your PIE tax rate or prescribed investor rate (PIR).
  • Inflation of 2% is assumed.

Calculator methodology

First, the KiwiSaver savings calculator asks you to select your contribution level, to provide details of your salary and to enter the current value of your KiwiSaver account(s). It then calculates the amount of regular employee and employer contributions during your KiwiSaver membership.

The employee and employer contributions are added to any current value of your KiwiSaver accounts, as are the assumed investment earnings and any tax credits due each period. The amounts are added up each pay period until you reach the age of 65. This is your total.

Next, the KiwiSaver savings calculator works out the regular income amount that you could get from the total during your expected retirement period. 

Results

The KiwiSaver savings calculator results show the total sum you would have in your KiwiSaver account at retirement and the regular income that you could get from that sum during your expected retirement period.

Results are shown with the effect of 2% inflation. To see your results without the effect of inflation, select the button Inflation adjusted results? so it turns off. You can include the effect of inflation again by reselecting the button so it turns on.

You can save your KiwiSaver savings calculator to your Sorted account so you can come back at a later date and review or update it.

What if?

If you choose an increased contribution amount, the KiwiSaver savings calculator shows you how much more you would have when you reach the age of 65 as well as the increased regular income you could get from KiwiSaver during retirement.

Have a go

Try the KiwiSaver savings calculator.

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KiwiSaver fees calculator

What it does

The KiwiSaver fees calculator shows you the total fees likely to be charged by KiwiSaver providers.

KiwiSaver providers automatically deduct their fees from your KiwiSaver account balance to meet management and administration costs. Fees are charged on more than just the costs of providing the investment return. They also vary depending on the risk level of the fund you choose and on the contributions you and your employer make.

Adjustment for inflation

Inflation of 2% is assumed.

Assumptions: Contributions

The KiwiSaver fees calculator assumes the following:

  • You are joining KiwiSaver today.
  • If you selected Employed, the KiwiSaver fees calculator assumes your pay increases at 3.5% per year and your contributions increase in line with your pay. For example, $200 today will be $230 in 4 years’ time. The assumed pay increase of 3.5% is included in the calculations by applying a margin to the assumed long term rate of inflation (2%). Note that you have the option of turning off the 2% adjustment for inflation.
  • If you select Self-employed or Not working and the Inflation adjusted results button is on (green), the KiwiSaver fees calculator assumes that the contribution amount increases each year with inflation. If you select Self-employed or Not working and the Inflation adjusted results button is off (red), the KiwiSaver fees calculator assumes that the contribution amount remains constant each year.
  • You take no contributions holidays.
  • No amounts are withdrawn for home purchase or mortgage diversion.
  • If you join KiwiSaver after age 60, you maintain your contribution levels for 5 years.
  • Tax credits worth a maximum of $521 are included at the end of each member credit year (1 July to 30 June). Note that to receive the total tax credit you must be a KiwiSaver member for the entire member credit year.
  • Your contributions, any employer contributions and the government's tax credits all earn interest in line with the fund's investment mix.

Assumptions: Provider fees

The KiwiSaver fees calculator assumes the following:

  • The current provider fee structure remains in place for the entire duration of KiwiSaver membership for all schemes.
  • Each provider has advised where GST applies to their fees and the results of the calculator take account of that advice.
  • Non-specific fees (such as where no specific details are given in the prospectus) vary for each provider and are between 0% and 0.3% of the funds under management.

Disclaimer

  • The information provided by the KiwiSaver fees calculator is a guide only and is not intended as investment advice. We recommend that investors seek independent advice.
  • All fees stated are subject to change in accordance with the offer and governing documents of each scheme.
  • The total fees paid and KiwiSaver balances used to calculate the Total fees paid (%), are illustrative only and do not reflect the actual or prospective performance of any KiwiSaver scheme or investment fund.
  • The returns to members of a KiwiSaver scheme are subject to investment and other risks, including loss of income and principal invested, and are not guaranteed. Returns will vary depending on the investment performance of the chosen investment fund or investment funds.
  • We do not accept any liability for any loss or damage of any kind arising out of the use of, or reliance on, the information provided on these pages including, without limitation, any loss of profit or other damage, direct or consequential.

Please also read our Terms and Conditions.

Calculator methodology

First, the KiwiSaver fees calculator asks you to select:

  • The month and year you were born, your employment status, your salary and your contribution level
  • Your employer contribution level, where applicable
  • The type of investment fund you prefer based on the level of risk you plan to take.

It uses these figures to calculate the amount of regular employee and employer contributions during your KiwiSaver membership. For each fund in the database, the calculator takes the contributions, adds the assumed investment earnings, adds any tax credits due and subtracts the expected fees that will be charged each period.

Each fund in the database is grouped into a risk category according to its benchmark asset mix. The benchmark asset mix is the proportion of total assets expected to be invested in the various asset classes (for example, equities, fixed interest, cash).

The average benchmark asset mix of all funds in the category is then calculated. The KiwiSaver fees calculator uses the average benchmark asset mix to calculate the rate of investment earnings. This means each fund in the same risk category is assumed to have the same rate of investment earnings.

The fees are totalled up and converted to a today’s dollar equivalent.

Results

The KiwiSaver fees calculator displays a list of KiwiSaver schemes and funds together with their risk level, whether they are an active or passive fund and shows the total amount of fees that it calculates would be deducted during your KiwiSaver membership between now and the time you turn 65. The fees are shown as a dollar value and as a percentage of your expected balance at age 65.

This enables you to easily compare various funds according to the total fees you might expect to pay. Remember, fees should be just one component in your comparison of different funds.  

You can choose to shrink the results list down to display just the schemes and funds you are interested in comparing. The Compare other options button enables you to return to the full list and compare other options if you wish.

Results are shown with the effect of 2% inflation. To see your results without the effect of inflation, select the button Inflation adjusted results? so it turns off. You can include the effect of inflation again by reselecting the button so it turns on.

You can save your KiwiSaver fees calculator to your Sorted account so you can come back at a later date and review or update it.

What if?

  • If you choose an increased contribution amount, the KiwiSaver fees calculator shows you how much more or less the expected fees would be.
  • If you choose a different type of fund, a different set of KiwiSaver schemes and funds are listed together with the expected fees that would be deducted.

Have a go

Try the KiwiSaver fees calculator.

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Investor kickstarter

The investor kickstarter gives you your investor type, a mix of investments that suits and the sorts of results you can expect. It also shows the dramatic difference that regularly adding to investments makes.

Calculator methodology

The investor kickstarter has nine multiple-choice questions that gather your details. The questions are about how much time you have to invest, how much capacity you have to invest, and how much risk you are comfortable taking.

Results

Based on your answers, the investor kickstarter identifies you as one of five investor types: aggressive, growth, balanced, conservative or defensive. These are terms generally used in the financial services industry, making it easier for you to discuss with a professional adviser.

For each type, a typical mix of investments is shown with the results you might expect. The investor kickstarter also displays graphs of a possible result and the range of results you could have.

You can use the dropdown selection box to compare your results with other investor types, too. If you save your investor kickstarter to your Sorted account, you can come back to it later and review or update it.

Assumptions

  • Each question and answer has been weighted in terms of importance (time questions: 40%, capacity questions 20%, personality questions: 40%).
  • Fees are estimated to be 1%.
  • Taxes are based on current PIR rates and depend on how the different kinds of investments are taxed.
  • Inflation is assumed to be 2% – the midpoint of the Reserve Bank’s inflation target of between 1% and 3%.
  • The projected returns are based on the investment outlook and analysis from Sorted’s actuaries. Results over different periods will vary.
  • The projected returns are only estimates and are no guarantee of investment performance. An investment’s past performance does not necessarily indicate how it will perform in the future.

Disclaimer

  • The information provided by the investor kickstarter is a guide only and is not intended as investment advice. We recommend that investors always seek professional advice.
  • The returns shown for the various mixes of investments are subject to risks and are not guaranteed. Returns will vary depending on the performance of individual investments.
  • We do not accept any liability for any loss or damage of any kind arising out of the use of, or reliance on, the information provided on these pages including, without limitation, any loss of profit or other damage, direct or consequential.
  • Please also read our terms and conditions.

Have a go

Try the investor kickstarter.

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